Garrulous

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Definition: one who talks a lot, mainly about trivial subjects (that you really don’t care for)

Pronunciation: GAR-u-les

Synonyms: blabby, chatty, conversational, gabby, talkative

Origin:

The PIE ‘gar’ root, meaning to call or to cry derived into the Greek ‘gerys’ meaning voice or sound. The Latin ‘garrire’ meaning to chatter later turned to ‘garrulus’ meaning talkative. As is, garrulous reached the English language in the early 1600s.

Why this word?

Him: Hi! How’s the planning coming along?

Me: Not bad. Once the dress is done- everything is done!

Him: Oh yea, I know all about it. When my sister was getting married, she constantly had problems with the dress! One day she was half a pound heavier, the next one pound lighter so she had to readjust the dress on a weekly basis!

Me: Hmm.

Him: No no, I mean, it was terrible! She was going crazy and yelling and screaming and all, at some point I just told her ‘you know what sis, give me a call when you calm down’.

Me: Yea I know…

Him: No no, you don’t know, she was crazy…..

And well, you get the point. We all have those people in the office, at the regular coffee shot or at the gym that are just waiting for an opportunity to open their mouth and never close it again and only deal with things and subject you really could not care less about.

So I thought we should have a good word for it!

How to use the word garrulous in a sentence?

Well, this is an adjective that describes blabby people.

“David is so garrulous! I swear, I avoid meeting him at the kitchen because I always know when it starts, but I have no way of knowing when it might end…!”

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About Author

Victoria Sheinkin is a writer, content editor, translator and chief editor for UnusedWords.com. Speaking three and a half languages, she holds two BAs from the Tel Aviv university- Communication and jounalism, English literature and linguistics.

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