Panacea

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Definition: Cure-all, heal-all, universal remedy, a solution

Pronunciation: pana-SEA

Origin:

With first English record around the early 1540s, this hopeful noun stems from the Greek pan meaning all and akos meaning to heal.

Why this word?

Since an all-healing substance is not yet available, this word, to me, is a bucket of potential. You can use it in any context, with any subject, wrapped with flowers and teddy bears.

Usually nouns refer to a certain object in the world or an idea, which is less tangible. But when you don’t have an actual object or an idea to support the word- it is really yours to do everything you want with it. Like being in a NY mall with a credit card given to you by Donald Trump or like being, well G*d. To a word. Okay- I exaggerated. But you get my point.

Take it- and do absolutely anything you want with it.

How to use the word panacea in a sentence?

“Julie held her head firmly between her hands, trying as much as she possibly could not to break down. The avalanche of bad news she was struck by was almost too much to handle. With complications in every scope of her life, the only thing she could hope for was a panacea”.

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About Author

Victoria Sheinkin is a writer, content editor, translator and chief editor for UnusedWords.com. Speaking three and a half languages, she holds two BAs from the Tel Aviv university- Communication and jounalism, English literature and linguistics.

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