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Pleonastic

To be redundant with words, to add superfluously.

Origin

Pleonastic, the adjective, stems from the noun pleonasm; dated back to the 1580’s, pleonasm originates from the Greek pleonasmus, a compound word made of pleo (more) and polys (much)together meaning- to be more than enough.

Pleonastic is first recorded in 1778, close to 200 apart from the first record to pleonasm.

It is interesting to note that while pleonasm means redundancy in words with pleonastic being the compatible adjective, there is nothing within the words themselves to represent speech or words.

Why this word?

Because it represents a very common and annoying phenomenon of people still talking, hours after their point had been elaborated upon. To me, people practicing pleonasm are those who have nothing of true meaning to say, but insist on being talkative nonetheless.

How to use pleonastic?

While you cannot address a person as pleonastic, you can use this great adjective to describe their speech. “Obama’s last speech was pleonastic; he took 35 minutes expressing a 3 minute idea”.

When it comes to speech and words, you can simply use ‘pleonastic’ to replace ‘redundant’.

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Written by Victoria Sheinkin

Victoria Sheinkin is a writer, content editor, translator and chief editor for UnusedWords.com. Speaking three and a half languages, she holds two BAs from the Tel Aviv university- Communication and jounalism, English literature and linguistics.

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