in ,

Chrysochlorous

Definition: The color of greenish-gold.

Pronunciation: “cry-soh-klor-uss”

Origin:

Greek. (“Opsis” relates to “vision”.)

Why this word?

I like it, aesthetically. It looks… safe? Does that make sense? (“No, Veronica. No it does not.”)

When I was a child, I learned that there were people in the world who wore the shells of iridescent, green-gold beetles as a form of jewelry; sometimes, the beetles were still alive, and tethered to the wearer’s clothes by little gold chains. The idea seemed so alien and exotic to me that I had hardly believed it (until I saw models being posed at a photoshoot wearing large blue, orange, and green beetles on their blouses like living brooches.)

Psychologically, the color green represents and/or inspires the emotions/sensations of refreshment, harmony, growth, and renewal. Where blue is the most soothing and calming color to the minds of human beings, green brings a slight edge of zest to how our brains receive and process its color.

(Also, keep in mind that there is no surefire way to determine whether or not “your green” is the exact same color or shade being recognized in your eyes and brain as “my green”. Each and every person’s individual qualia– or registration of the qualities of our surrounding environments –are different. What is Real Red might not be the shade of light that one’s culture has taught them to recognize as “red”.)

Bottom line: Science is amazing, and our world is beyond incredible– Three separate veins of wildly different topics, all tied together with the existence of one little color.

(Boom-dee-yada, boom-dee-yada…)

How to use this word in a sentence?

Example: “It was a chrysochlorous shield of light, diaphanous in its feigned lightness and obvious delicacy. She worried that even breathing near this strange bauble would unsettle its tenuous pedestal and allow gravity to reach up with the shift of weight and do the rest of the destructive work.”

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Written by Veronica Jacobs

Veronica Jacobs is a fiction writer, blogger, academic editor, and sci-fi enthusiast. Currently working freelance (with a background in English Literature), she spends most of her time writing.

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